What a morning I had yesterday.  Bob Lussier, Mike Tully and I headed out early to shoot a different location in South Portland, ME (images to follow in a future post), and decided to visit Portland Head Light afterwards. Although we arrived past sunrise, the light was still sweet, and allowed us time to explore all around the lighthouse to take advantage of the beautiful conditions.

After shooting closer to the lighthouse, we trekked down an icy slope to get down to the rocks and spent some time at this wonderful vantage point as our last spot to shoot.  With my trusty 10 stop ND filter, I was able to get some nice long exposures that added a misty quality to the rocks and waves, while adding nice color saturation as well.


Reaching for the Light

Doesn’t it look like these tree branches are reaching toward the lighthouse?  Well even if they aren’t, this is a bit of a different take on this iconic lighthouse.  Portland Head Light has been photographed so many times, it’s hard to find a unique spin on it.  This is my attempt.


Dawn at the Light

Today’s image is an early morning shot of one of Maine’s lesser known lighthouses, Portland Head Light.  OK, just kidding.  As anyone from New England will tell you, this is supposedly the most photographed lighthouse in the U.S.  Or maybe Nubble Light is.  Anyway… I haven’t photographed Portland Head Light in way too many years, and being that I was in Portland for the weekend, I had no choice but to visit at sunrise.

As you can see, it was a very cloudy morning, and there were more than a few cold and disappointed photographers there without some nice morning color.  Be that as it may, I was still able to grab a few shots I liked, including this one, which was the first I took that morning.  The slight hint of color on the left is actually coming from the lights of the city, and was just enough early on to add some additional interest.  I was also pleased to be able to capture Ram Island Ledge Lighthouse in the background on the right side.  A cold and cloudy, but still somewhat satisfying morning.


Today’s image is another shot of the Spring Point Ledge Light in Portland, Maine.  The long exposure here allowed the water to take on that silky look, but it also had an interesting effect on the light and colors in the sky.  The sun was rising to the right of the lighthouse, and the darker colors of the sky to the west (left) took on a more saturated look with the long exposure.  I’m not completely sold on this unintended effect, but I still like how the image turned out.  What do you think?


Here is another view of the Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse with more of the breakwater in the composition.  This is such a beautiful place to be at sunrise, and I can imagine how much the past keepers of the lighthouse must’ve appreciated their view.  Especially once the breakwater was built, and they weren’t as stranded as when the tower stood alone at the entrance to the harbor.  And here’s a random fact for you:  someone once figured out that in order to get some exercise at the lighthouse prior to having the breakwater, the keeper would need to run 56 laps around the tower’s main deck to equal one mile.  I wonder which would happen first when running those laps – dizziness, exhaustion, or boredom.  Or perhaps all of the above?


Well I’m pleased to report that my blog and I have decided to get back together again.  About two weeks ago we decided that we perhaps could use some time away from one another.  I had said some things I didn’t mean.  The blog said some things it didn’t mean.  Things were starting to get very uncomfortable.  But after our time apart, we both feel like we’re at a good place to get back to blogging again.  Thanks for your patience and support during this challenging time for both of us.  🙂

Seriously, though.   A little break was needed from blogging, and I’m glad I took the time away.  I didn’t do much of anything related to photography for about two weeks until this past weekend when I spent a few days up in Maine filling some memory cards.  I now have new images to share with everyone starting with this shot of the Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse in Portland, Maine.  It’s a brilliant example of a “sparkplug” style lighthouse, and protects Portland harbor.  Although the light was first lit in 1897, the 900-foot breakwater I’m standing on wasn’t built until 1951, and now provides easy accessibility to the lighthouse.  The tower is closed to visitors, but there are plenty of angles and compositions to shoot it from the outside.  I’ll share more images of this magnificent lighthouse in future posts.

P.S.  I’m looking forward to catching up on all of your posts that I’ve missed over the past few weeks.