Although I have yet to pick up my camera in the new year, I feel compelled to create my first blog post of 2017.  And I’m doing so with this image from this past summer.  It was taken at the Rachel Carson Wildlife Refuge in Wells, ME during our annual family vacation in Ogunquit.  After catching the incredible pre-dawn light, I came across this perfect little bench at a viewing area along the trail through the marsh as the sun began to come up.

Even though the bench is facing the away from the rising sun, it’s still a beautiful and peaceful spot to watch the sunrise.  And I was not in any hurry to leave.


Transition

This image is another from the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells, ME from my vacation in late August.  As I mentioned in my previous post, this part of the refuge is a beautiful 1 mile loop that meanders through forest and salt marsh along Maine’s southern coast.  This particular spot is one of several boardwalks along the loop that provide incredible views of the surrounding area.

Typically on sunrise shoots, I’m packing up my gear once the sun rises high enough above the horizon and the light becomes too harsh to shoot towards it.  Thankfully on this day, I had a scene behind me worth shooting, and simply turned around from where I was capturing the sky to the east and was treated to beautiful warm light hitting the trees and boardwalk to the west.  This location is really quite amazing, and I was taken by the transition of marsh to forest, while also witnessing the transition from dawn to daylight.  And did I mention that I was the only one there the entire time?  An awesome morning all around.


Morning BeautyI just got back from a family vacation in southern Maine, and managed to get out for sunrise on a couple of occasions.  This particular morning presented an absolutely beautiful display of clouds and color with zero wind; perfect conditions for some long exposures.  So where is this, you ask?  It’s the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in York, ME.  It was my first time visiting the refuge, and I can guarantee I’ll be back again soon.  It’s an impressively large place, with thousands of acres of protected land spread out from Kittery all the way to Cape Elizabeth near Portland.  I chose to explore the southern part, and the trail I was on is an easy 1 mile loop through the refuge that provides several lookout spots along the salt marsh and woods.  Although the tide was low, this little estuary made a great leading line through the image towards the rising sun.  Morning beauty indeed.


Pastel Sky

There are certain colors that you seem to only see in the summertime in New England, and the colors of the clouds at sunset are a perfect example.  Incredible pastels can light up the sky when the sun rises or sets.  On this particular night, the sunset I was hoping for didn’t materialize at my original destination.  So I decided to jump back in the car and head to the salt marsh house in Essex to see if the post-sunset sky would have anything to offer.  And as you can see, it certainly did.  The 500+ mosquitos and gnats per square inch was a steep price to pay for this shot, but definitely worth it.


Winding

Not much to say about this image.  Living in New England I’m fortunate to have easy access to the many salt marshes in the area, and I’m always on the lookout for small and winding rivers and streams among the marshes such as this one.  With a better sky I would’ve left this shot in color, but decided to minimize the sky instead and convert to black and white.


Autumn Marsh

Although I didn’t get in very much shooting this fall, I did manage to squeeze in a few brief trips around the local area to see what I could find.  This particular marsh area is one I’ve driven by thousands of times, but never stopped to photograph it.  Mainly because it’s on a very busy road, and I’m always going somewhere with no time to stop.

So I finally decided to head over a few weeks ago.  I had to park at a restaurant and walk along the road to get to the spot I wanted, but it was certainly worth it.  The colors were amazing, and there were a few birch tree trunks to provide a little contrast.

I’m once again ending this fall season as I’ve done virtually every year, telling myself… next fall I need to shoot more.  🙂


Stormy Skies

So… after a somewhat lengthy separation and some time apart, my camera and I have decided to resolve our issues and get back together.

It really has been quite some time since my last blog post, stemming from a long drawn-out winter, a new job, and a busy family.  But I managed to get out of the house this weekend to finally do some shooting, and I convinced my friend Bob Lussier to join me for an afternoon of shooting up on the north shore.  We started in Rockport, and ended up in Essex where this image was taken.   It was a very windy and cloudy afternoon, which always makes for some nice long exposure photography.  Our much needed shooting was then followed by some much needed fried clams.  A great afternoon to get a jump start on the upcoming summer season.

Feels good to be back.


Solemn

There are certain scenes that beg for the beautiful colors of sunrise or sunset, and then there are others that to me work much better under cloudy and gloomy skies.  Anytime we have overcast or foggy days in the summer, I like to head out to some of the local salt marshes to find locations like this one here in Essex, MA.

Oh yeah, and there’s also a really good clam shack right next to where I was standing when I grabbed this shot.  That just might have had something to do with my choice of location. Might have.


Passage

Just a quick post for today.  This is one side of the marked entrance for boats leading under a bridge over part of the salt marsh in Newbury, MA.  For whatever reason, this wooden structure jutting out into the water caught my eye, and I really like the minimalist composition here.  It was a foggy day which helped add to the mood I was trying to create.


Moon Over Marsh

Although I got up early to catch the sunrise on this cold morning, it was the setting moon that became the focus of my attention.  It was incredibly bright, and of course big, as it slowly set behind the marsh.  You can even catch a glimpse of it’s reflection in the water if you look closely.  I used the longest focal length I could to get the moon to look as big as possible, while also keeping the water in the frame.  A bit of a balancing act, but I like the look I was able to create.