Jenne Farm

This is the Jenne Farm in Reading, VT.  You may know it as one of the most photographed farms in New England, if not the United States. And you know what? I was thrilled to finally get there and make some images, exactly as many, many photographers have done before me.  There was a time when I wanted to avoid the most photographed ______ in the country or world, thinking that how could I possibly create something that no one else has before.  What I’ve discovered is that I don’t always need to create something new and different from everyone else’s images of a location.  These places are the most photographed _______ for good reason, which is typically the sheer beauty of them.  So why not get there and make some magic.

The Jenne Farm is no exception.  It is the quintessential New England farm – especially in the fall – and I couldn’t be happier with the images I made there, regardless of how similar they may be to others.  Now after saying all that, I was fortunate to have the cows feeding right in front me, which is an added bonus that I haven’t seen in too many other images.  A happy accident I was happy to come across.  Had the cows not been there, however, I would’ve been just as satisfied with the shot.


 

Vermont Foliage From Above

As I’m sure is the case with many photographers, fall in New England is my absolute favorite season.  Both for photography, and for just about everything else.  Cool, crisp air and beautiful foliage makes it an enjoyable time of year to be outside exploring. And Vermont is one of my favorite places to be during the season.  I spent two days in north central Vermont last week taking in as much of it as I possibly could, and came away with some images I’ll be sharing here on the blog.

Some online scouting resulted in the location for today’s image.  It’s a fantastic spot with unbelievable views of Cabot and the surrounding area.  The hike up is reasonably short, but is definitely a bit strenuous, climbing 300-400 feet in elevation over roughly half a mile.  Once at the top, however, the climb up becomes totally worthwhile.  To get this specific vantage point requires standing on a narrow rock ledge with a sheer vertical drop to the forest below, and is definitely not for anyone with a fear of heights.  I had hiked up hoping for a colorful sunset, but unfortunately the clouds were not present that evening.  With that said, the foliage below was stunning (and almost at peak), and the setting sun added some additional interest.  This will definitely be on my list to visit in the future whenever I get back to Vermont.


Transition

This image is another from the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells, ME from my vacation in late August.  As I mentioned in my previous post, this part of the refuge is a beautiful 1 mile loop that meanders through forest and salt marsh along Maine’s southern coast.  This particular spot is one of several boardwalks along the loop that provide incredible views of the surrounding area.

Typically on sunrise shoots, I’m packing up my gear once the sun rises high enough above the horizon and the light becomes too harsh to shoot towards it.  Thankfully on this day, I had a scene behind me worth shooting, and simply turned around from where I was capturing the sky to the east and was treated to beautiful warm light hitting the trees and boardwalk to the west.  This location is really quite amazing, and I was taken by the transition of marsh to forest, while also witnessing the transition from dawn to daylight.  And did I mention that I was the only one there the entire time?  An awesome morning all around.


 

Rolling Hills of the Palouse

This is the landscape I flew across the country to see.  The Palouse region of Washington state has been on my photography bucket list for some time, and I’m so grateful I had the opportunity to visit the area with the NxNW crew last week.  We had an incredible time and got to see some truly stunning landscapes.

One of the iconic locations in the Palouse is Steptoe Butte.  It’s basically a small mountain of about 3,600 feet in elevation that provides panoramic views of the surrounding farmland, hills and distant mountains.  Driving up the road to the top you’re treated to beautiful vistas in every direction, providing unlimited photographic opportunities.  Pictures just don’t do it any justice, but of course I had to try.

On our first full day in the area, we drove up the butte at both sunrise and sunset as the light is remarkably different in the morning versus the evening.  This particular image was taken just before sunset as the low light of the sun casted shadows across the hills.  Just spectacular.


Stormy Skies

So… after a somewhat lengthy separation and some time apart, my camera and I have decided to resolve our issues and get back together.

It really has been quite some time since my last blog post, stemming from a long drawn-out winter, a new job, and a busy family.  But I managed to get out of the house this weekend to finally do some shooting, and I convinced my friend Bob Lussier to join me for an afternoon of shooting up on the north shore.  We started in Rockport, and ended up in Essex where this image was taken.   It was a very windy and cloudy afternoon, which always makes for some nice long exposure photography.  Our much needed shooting was then followed by some much needed fried clams.  A great afternoon to get a jump start on the upcoming summer season.

Feels good to be back.


Standing Silent

It’s been several days since my last blog post as my new job has been keeping me quite busy.  But I’m back today with a shot from the archives that I rediscovered the other day.

This was from a fall visit to Ogunquit, Maine a few years back.  Anyone who has ever visited this wonderful coastal community knows that the shoreline all along the Marginal Way is filled with scenes like this one.  The endless array of photo opportunities here is one of the reasons that I keep coming back time and again.


Solemn

There are certain scenes that beg for the beautiful colors of sunrise or sunset, and then there are others that to me work much better under cloudy and gloomy skies.  Anytime we have overcast or foggy days in the summer, I like to head out to some of the local salt marshes to find locations like this one here in Essex, MA.

Oh yeah, and there’s also a really good clam shack right next to where I was standing when I grabbed this shot.  That just might have had something to do with my choice of location. Might have.



Fenced In

Living in New England, there is almost always a farm to be explored and photographed somewhere nearby.  And for me, finding a farm I haven’t photographed before means opportunities in all seasons when nothing else is inspiring me.  I grabbed this shot on a cool spring afternoon, before the leaves started to bloom.  Since there was little color in this scene, I decided to convert to B&W to highlight the textures in the fence and grass.


The Basin II

Today’s post is another image from the Basin in Lincoln, NH.  Just as in my post the other day, you can see the beautiful curves and shapes that have been formed by years and years of flowing water here.  I’m really looking forward to getting back there in the fall to capture some swirling leaves in the water.