Weber House at Dusk

One of the highlights of our recent trip to the Palouse was the afternoon/evening we spent photographing the Weber House just outside of Pullman, WA.  It’s a fairly well-known landmark among photographers, and we weren’t at all surprised to see a dozen of them set up there when we arrived a little before sunset.  What did surprise us was the fact that all of them left before the sun went down, leaving the whole place just for our crew.

And we certainly took advantage, getting shots as the sun went down, then at dusk, some light painting when it got dark, and lastly some milky way shots.  Although I really loved the shots of the house and the milky way above, I think this was my favorite from the shoot.


Weber House and the Milky Way

I just returned from an epic photography trip to the Palouse region of Washington state.  Four plus days of shooting some incredibly beautiful landscapes with a terrific group of photographers known as NxNW.  This was my first time joining this group, and it was absolutely amazing.  We visited many of the major spots in the area including Steptoe Butte and Palouse Falls, as well as several of the old abandoned barns and homes that dot the landscape.  Sleep was about the only thing not on our agenda as we shot from sunrise through the evening, with a brief break during the middle of each day to recharge our batteries and back-up our images.

Although today’s image was taken on our last night, I couldn’t resist using it as my first blog post from my trip.  This is the Weber House (Homestead) outside Pullman, WA.  It’s a well-known location for photographers, and it certainly didn’t disappoint.  We got there in the afternoon to shoot sunset, and ended up staying late to get some Milky Way images as well.  This was my first time photographing the Milky Way, and I have to admit, I’m hooked.  I can’t wait to try this again somewhere local (or close to local as it’s fairly bright where I live).

We were also fortunate to catch a huge meteor that streaked across the sky while we were capturing the Milky Way.  I was working on some star trails when the meteor lit up the sky, so my capture  wasn’t great as a standalone image.  Some of the NxNW crew were able to catch it as well, and I’m sure you’ll see their images soon on their respective blogs and social media posts.

I’ll be posting more Palouse images in the coming days and weeks, including some other views of the Weber House, so stay tuned.


Summer House

No, it’s unfortunately not my summer house.  But it did catch my eye the other day, and I had to pull over to grab a few shots.  I initially processed the image in color, but decided to bring it into Silver Efex Pro to convert to B&W.

P.S.  I’m available to move into it should anyone want to buy it for me.


House on the Marsh

If you’re a regular visitor to my blog, you may recognize this house as I’ve posted images of it several times in the past.  One of the great things about it is the fact that you can keep coming back in different seasons and weather conditions, and each time it will offer you a new way of photographing it.  For this image, it was a cloudy and somewhat overcast day, and I just really liked the serene feeling that this wonderful soft light provided.



Frozen Marsh

Well we survived Nemo this weekend… all 28+ inches of it.  Aside from a driving ban for a day and a half, and some sore muscles from shoveling, it was a great snow storm.  Huddling by the fire watching movies.  Wondering if the power would go out as the snow kept piling up.  I loved every minute of it.  And watching my kids sled and make snow forts reminded me of the blizzard of ’78 when I was their age.  I loved every minute of it then too.

Once the driving ban was lifted, I made a few quick trips around to see what some of my favorite locations looked like buried in snow.  Unfortunately it was difficult stopping anywhere as the roads were more narrow than usual, and many parking areas were not cleared.  I did grab a few shots, however, including this one of the salt marsh in Essex, MA.  It’s strange to see it frozen, when it’s typically flowing with water among green grass like in this image.  I guess it’s a different kind of beautiful in the winter.


Island HomeSometimes it’s nice to take a little break from my usual menu of lighthouses or seascapes or abandoned mills, and shoot something more simple.  This is nothing more than a little red house on Monhegan Island in Maine, but there was just something so quaint and inviting about it, that I had to take it’s picture.


Well, it was more like immediately before the storm.  The elapsed time from when I pressed the shutter to when the rain started coming down was unfortunately not equal to the time it took to find shelter from said rain.  Luckily there was a few minutes of light rain before the deluge came, and myself and my equipment were able to stay mostly dry.  I’ve found that some of the best images contain a sky that’s about to punish you for standing under it.


I haven’t done very much night shooting, but it’s something I would like to try more often.  I usually pack up towards the end of the magic blue hour, but I decided to try some shots the other night when it was truly night.  This is the keeper’s house at Marshall Point Lighthouse in Port Clyde, Maine.  The house is now a museum and store, and they apparently like to leave the lights on at night, for which I said thank you very much.  The interior light combined with the light illuminating the front of the house from the lighthouse itself made for a nice subject against the star-filled sky.  I found it challenging to get an exposure that would show the stars and not blow out the highlights from the house lights.  This exposure was the best compromise I could get.  I was exhausted that night, and didn’t even think about blending multiple exposures.  Oh well, maybe next time.   I’ll have more images to share of this famous lighthouse in future posts.