Back Bay Blues

Boston’s Back Bay area is loaded with wonderful architecture and landmarks that can provide a wide variety of photo opportunities.  And for some reason, I hardly ever visit there with my camera.  I finally made some time this past summer, however, to come into town and create some images, and set up camp at the Boston Public Garden.  There are great views of the city in several directions here, along with the signature pond, hundreds of trees, winding pathways, a bridge and more.  I wanted a shot of the former John Hancock Tower (now 200 Clarendon) and thought the pond would make an excellent foreground subject against the building and the Back Bay skyline.  I was not alone.  The place was packed with “pro” photographers sporting all manner of iPhones and iPads trying to capture the scene.  I think my X-T1 and tripod were probably the right call.

 


Boston Waterfront

I have worked in the city of Boston for the majority of my professional career, and I feel as though I know the city quite well.  It’s buildings, streets, etc. are all very familiar to me.  Yet when I have the chance to take in the city from an elevated point of view, it always seems to take on a new look for me.  The view from the observation deck of the Custom House is no exception.  This was taken a short while before the sun set to the west of where I was standing, and I love how the last of the warm sun was lighting up parts of the various buildings that make up the Boston skyline.

There are pretty amazing views from all four sides of the observation deck, and I ended up moving around more than I probably should’ve trying to get the “shot” of the city at sunset.  Fortunately I spent more time before sunset at this specific location, and was able to frame the image exactly as I wanted, and could wait for the light to be as I wanted it too.  This is definitely a spot I plan to revisit soon.


Sunset Over Boston

The sunset over the city of Boston last night was spectacular.  I had chosen a new vantage point for some skyline shots, and was on the observation deck of the Custom House tower.  This building is a Boston landmark, and appears in many if not most images of the the Boston skyline.  Aside from being a beautiful structure on its own, its observation deck provides some great views of the city and surrounding area.  The only challenge here is the fact that the deck is surrounded by a serious fence, and you need to conduct tripod gymnastics to get your camera to point through the fence.

This image is looking to the north towards the North End and Charlestown further in the distance.  The sky put on quite a show, and added great mood to this city skyline image.  I’ll have more images to share in later posts.


The Gahden

No, that’s not a typo.  It’s how you say “garden” when you’re from Boston.  Or at least every movie made about our city in the past 20 years would make you think that’s how you say it.

Anyway, this is a fairly common view of the Boston Garden and the Zakim bridge, and one I’d been wanting to get for a while now.  So when I had a chance to go into the city a few nights ago for some sunset shooting (images to follow later), I made sure to stop at this spot before I drove home.  Traffic was just strong enough to create some light trails, and although the clouds had mostly disappeared when the blue hour hit, there were still enough to add some additional interest.


Boston Cold

It was a bitterly cold sunset when Bob, Mike and I visited Lo Presti Park in East Boston to shoot the Boston skyline.  Getting there a bit early only added to our enjoyment of early winter in Boston, but we stuck it out, and were rewarded with a pretty good sunset.  This spot has become one of my favorite places to photograph the skyline, with so many options for foreground interest in these old piers.


Boston At Night in the Fall

Today’s image is another shot from the Kelby Worldwide Photowalk that took place in Boston a few weeks ago.  Although I work in the city, I rarely spend any time photographing it at night, which is why I chose to join this event. 

In addition to the obvious skyline shots, I was looking to find some interesting elements to include in my images.  As I walked by this tree that had tuned a beautiful yellow, I saw that it would not only make a nice foreground interest, but it would also do a nice job framing the buildings in the background.


The other night I had the privilege of joining a great group of photographers to shoot the Boston skyline from Fan Pier behind the federal courthouse.  I was joined by Bob Lussier, Dave Wilson, Rich Williams, Brian Arsenault , and Stewart Mellentine on what turned out to be a stormy, but thankfully dry, evening of shooting, followed by much needed food and beer.  Or maybe it was beer and food.

I’ve shot the Boston skyline several times in the past from this location, so just like Rich mentioned in his post, I tried some different angles to get something I hadn’t done before.  The position of these benches wasn’t ideal for what I was going for, but I still like the added dimension they give the image.

Have a great weekend!


It’s been a while since I posted a shot from Newburyport, so I thought I’d dig into the archives for one today.  This was taken right in downtown, and contrary to the lack of snow, it was taken just a few days after Christmas.  Now this is the type of shot that I’d normally process as an HDR, but for some reason I just liked the way the O EV bracket looked on its own.  I made a few slight tweaks in Lightroom, but that was about it.  I did consider masking/cloning out the mysterious woman in the middle (who was standing oddly still for a 4 second exposure btw), but then decided to keep her to add some human interest.  On a side note, this is one of my ongoing internal debates about my photography – whether to have people in my images or not.   While I do prefer to keep my images free of people, sometimes there are images like this one where having people in it actually works.  I suppose I usually just end up doing what feels right for each image.   What do you think?

Camera settings: ISO 200, f/8, 18mm, 4 seconds


For today’s post I thought I’d try more of an abstract image instead of my more typical stuff.  This building is in downtown Boston, and I’ve arguably driven/walked past it thousands of times without giving it much thought.  The other day, however, I was in my car at a red light, and looked up at what was a really unique perspective on the building.  Thankfully I had my camera on the front seat, and I was able to grab a few shots out the window before the light turned green.  I opted for a darker, more textural look for this shot, as it seemed to fit the image well.  And by the way, I seriously considered calling the post “Jenga,” as the way the beams are structured reminded me of the game.

Camera Settings: ISO 400, f/11, 70mm, 1/100 second


Today’s post is another image of the Boston skyline taken from behind the federal courthouse.  It’s a similar vantage point to an image I posted here, but I wanted to try a different angle and thought the lamp post would make an interesting foreground subject.

Nikon D90, Nikkor 18-70, f/13, 18mm, 3 brackets