Fishing Shacks

This was the original destination for our visit to Portland, ME this past weekend.  I had seen a few images of this location online, and finally had an opportunity to go up there and get a shot of my own.  Along with fellow photographers Bob Lussier and Mike Tully of course.

These three shacks are on Fisherman’s Point and can be seen and photographed from Willard Beach in South Portland.  We were fortunate to get some really nice color in the sky just before sunrise, and with the tide just starting to recede, the ocean added a nice foreground element as it held the reflection of the sky.  I’m looking forward to getting back here in the spring to get a different perspective on this wonderful spot.

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February 21, 2017

Portland Head Light Rocks

What a morning I had yesterday.  Bob Lussier, Mike Tully and I headed out early to shoot a different location in South Portland, ME (images to follow in a future post), and decided to visit Portland Head Light afterwards. Although we arrived past sunrise, the light was still sweet, and allowed us time to explore all around the lighthouse to take advantage of the beautiful conditions.

After shooting closer to the lighthouse, we trekked down an icy slope to get down to the rocks and spent some time at this wonderful vantage point as our last spot to shoot.  With my trusty 10 stop ND filter, I was able to get some nice long exposures that added a misty quality to the rocks and waves, while adding nice color saturation as well.

February 19, 2017

Nubble Spotlight

It had been quite some time since I last visited Nubble Light in York, ME, so I decided to make the short trip up there this afternoon to catch the sunset.

The tide was low and the water was as calm as I’ve seen it, but the sky made up for it with some nice color just before the sun went down. And having some of that warm sunlight shine directly on the lighthouse really made the scene special.

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January 29, 2017

Front Row Seat

Although I have yet to pick up my camera in the new year, I feel compelled to create my first blog post of 2017.  And I’m doing so with this image from this past summer.  It was taken at the Rachel Carson Wildlife Refuge in Wells, ME during our annual family vacation in Ogunquit.  After catching the incredible pre-dawn light, I came across this perfect little bench at a viewing area along the trail through the marsh as the sun began to come up.

Even though the bench is facing the away from the rising sun, it’s still a beautiful and peaceful spot to watch the sunrise.  And I was not in any hurry to leave.

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January 4, 2017

2016 – Year in Review

As 2016 comes to a close, I thought I’d try something a bit different this year by not only highlighting some of my favorite shots from the year, but also including some thoughts/general musings I’ve had throughout the year.  I’m not sure how I arrived at 18 of them, but I don’t think having a round number makes the slightest bit of difference.  Some of these images didn’t appear on the blog during the year, as I was on a bit of a hiatus for a while, but I believe they’re just as worthy of inclusion as the others. So without further ado, I present 2016 in pictures.  And random thoughts.

1. I am much less concerned with how many likes or comments I get on my images than I used to be. I post them because I enjoy sharing them.

2. Photography is so incredibly subjective. Many images I post which I really like seem to get little attention on social media, and vice versa.  You just never know what will resonate and with whom.

3. Coming home from a shoot with no keepers is never a bad thing. Being out there shooting is what it’s really all about. At least it is for me.

4. Unless it’s a portrait shoot, and then you’re in big trouble if you have no keepers.

5. I still get a rush when I see a beautiful image on my camera’s LCD screen.

6. Sunrise is the most beautiful part of the day. The rest of the day is always playing catch up.

7. Photography has made me look at the world differently.

8. I absolutely love that after years of saying to my kids “look how pretty the sky is tonight,” they now say this to me on their own.

9. I don’t shoot often enough.

10. Winning a photo contest provides great satisfaction. It does not necessarily provide fame, fortune or increased image sales.

11. The best gear you can buy is just that – gear. Great light, a strong composition, and the patience to wait for them to come together are what make an image memorable; not the gear.

12. With that said, I really do love shooting with the gear I have.

13. For every beautiful sunrise or sunset I’ve captured with the my camera, I’ve walked away with nothing ten times more often. If it were easy, everyone would do it.

14. Sometimes the best view is the one behind you. Never forget to turn around.

15. I need to spend more time promoting myself and my work.

16. I love that when on vacation, my wife and kids sleep in while I quietly go out to shoot sunrise. I come back as everyone is waking up, and it’s a beautiful thing.

17. It’s kinda funny that I post images of beautiful landscapes as often as possible, but never post a picture of a beautiful spreadsheet I create at my real job.

18. I can’t wait to see what 2017 brings.

Thanks for following along this year.  Best wishes for a happy and healthy new year.

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December 26, 2016

Marginal Way Sunrise

As we brace for the first real arctic cold of the winter here in the northeast, I thought I’d post an image from warmer times.  This shot was captured this past summer in Ogunquit, Maine along the famous Marginal Way.  This mile-plus path winds it way along stunning rock cliffs  from Ogunquit beach to Perkins Cove, and provides unlimited photographic opportunities.  Sunrise, in my opinion, is the best time to be there – not only for witnessing the beauty of the sun coming up over the ocean and cliffs, but also for the peacefulness and quiet of being there virtually alone. The Marginal Way gets quite crowded during the day in the summer, so I really look forward to being there at sunrise.

I woke up early to a promising forecast, and was certainly rewarded for the effort.  As I walked along the path, I was seeking out some leading lines in the patterns of the rocks that would take the viewer right out to the morning sky, and found this spot which did the trick.  I’m definitely looking forward to getting back there this winter to get some images with snow on the rocks.  Once I’m a little more used to the cold that is.

December 15, 2016

Vermont Village

 

Vermont Village

Waits River, Vermont is one the quaint villages I was seeking when I visited the area earlier this fall.  It’s one of those locations that you need to know about in advance, however, as you risk driving right through it without noticing much more than the nice church as you pass by.  In order to get a good angle and composition that includes the various buildings, you need to turn down this narrow road to get the view back up towards the church.  Advanced research and scouting of the area was definitely key on this trip.

As I’ve mentioned in prior posts about this trip, I was really lucky to get these foggy mornings which when timed right, can provide beautiful light as the fog lifts.  When I first passed though the area before sunrise, I couldn’t see the church as I stood right in front of it.  But later that morning as the fog started to clear, I was treated to some beautiful, almost ethereal, light.  The fog was still obscuring most of the colorful foliage in the background, but for this particular image, I didn’t really care – I had the shot I wanted.

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November 21, 2016

Morris Island Lighthouse

 

Morris Island Lighthouse

Taking a break from the fall foliage images with a lighthouse shot from my recent visit to Charleston, SC.  The Morris Island Lighthouse, a non-working lighthouse just north of Folly Beach at the entrance to Charleston Harbor, stands just a few hundred feet off the coast. It’s 161 feet tall, and was completed in 1876.  Over time, jetties were built to protect the harbor, which accelerated the erosion on Morris Island around the lighthouse.  In 1938, the lighthouse became too difficult to reach and maintain, and thus became automated. By 1962, the lighthouse was too close to the shore due to continued erosion on the island, and state officials ordered it closed.  It was replaced by Charleston Light on the north side of nearby Sullivan’s Island, and is now being preserved by the state of South Carolina.

While all this history is very interesting, I was drawn to the great compositional possibilities of the lighthouse that include this jetty on the northern end of Folly Beach that leads right out to the tower in the distance.  I used a long lens to compress the scene and bring the rocks and lighthouse closer together.  The sunrise that morning wasn’t too exciting, but did provide a nice pink/red glow to the sky.

 

November 10, 2016

Fog Rising

 

Fog Rising

Today’s image is another one from my recent visit to Vermont.  The village of East Corinth was high on my list of locations to shoot after seeing some images of the town online, and more importantly, after learning that it was the setting for the movie Beetlejuice.  It’s one of Tim Burton’s best movies, and one of my personal favorites, and I of course had to watch it again after photographing the area.

I had arrived here before sunrise, hoping for some nice light on the church and the surrounding landscape.  I was instead greeted by a blanket of fog that obscured anything further than two feet in front of me.  So after waiting for some time with no relief from the fog, I decided to get back in my car and explore the area in hopes of returning later to see the fog rising before the sun got too high.  About an hour later I came back to the same spot, and found gorgeous light hitting the church and colorful trees behind it as the fog began to lift.  It was a truly amazing scene, and I was fortunate to have timed my return just right.  Have I mentioned that I love Vermont in the fall?

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October 24, 2016

Foggy Path

Foggy Path

Vermont is filled with scenes like this one.  Trees turning color, fog in the morning, and an old dirt road leading somewhere interesting. I love to find spots like this while out exploring or on my way to a another location.  On this particular morning, the fog was incredibly think in the low-lying areas of central Vermont, and many of the places I was hoping to shoot were blanketed with too much fog to create images.  So instead, I spent the morning driving around with no agenda, other than to look for scenes just like this.  This spot caught my eye while turning around on a small side street, and I set up a composition that would include the dirt road as a leading line through the image, while also getting in the trees and a bit of foggy background. A simple scene, but one that I really like.

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October 15, 2016
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